Rebeca Méndez

Selected Works

CircumSolar, Migration 3

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2013. Single-channel video projected at architectural scale, color, sound by Drew Schnurr; 17:46 minutes. This work is a contemplation on migratory sea birds captured during their breeding season at Látrabjarg, the western most point of Iceland, which is the largest bird cliff in all Europe. The spatial shift, together with a low video frame rate defamiliarizing the seascape so we may understand the migratory impetus as code; a genetic code for evolutionary preservation.

CircumSolar, Migration 1

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2013. Single channel video installation. 26:20 minutes.
Circumsolar, Migration1 follows the migration of the arctic tern, a small sea bird that has the longest migration of all living beings on earth, flying from the Arctic to the Antarctic and back again each year. As such, it experiences two polar summers of 24-hour daylight each year, which makes it the one creature in the world that lives the most daylight.

Circum/bi/polar

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2013. Photographic essay from Svalbard, in the high arctic. ‘In 2010 Rebeca Méndez traveled to Longyearbyen, the largest city on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago to join a group of international artists, scientists, architects, and educators in an Arctic expedition. Participating in a three-week residency program aboard the Noorderlicht, a two-masted ice-class sailing vessel, the group collectively explored one of the most remote and unusual places on earth.’ — Alma Ruiz, senior curator, MOCA.

CircumSolar, Migration 2

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2013. Mural. Fire retardant canvas and ink. 25 × 132 feet. ~1,250 sq. ft. approximately. Pico Rivera Public Library. Civic art commissioned by the Los Angeles Arts Commission.
CircumSolar, Migration 2 considers the library’s role as a vehicle for exploration and discovery that lead to a journey into knowledge. It is dedicated to the voyage of the arctic tern, the world champion in long-distance migration.

Observation Post 1

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2013. Public art at the Pico Rivera Public Library, commissioned by the Los Angeles Arts Commission. Sculpture. Corten Steel. 12 × 8 × 28 feet.
Observation Post 1 is a sculpture by Rebeca Méndez, commissioned by the Los Angeles County Arts Commission for the Pico Rivera Public Library. It is made of nine thousand pounds of 1 inch thick Corten Steel, and is composed of two observations posts, a walking / observation platform and a viewing frame.

Quagmire

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2011. Single-channel video projection, continuous loop projected onto an 8-feet diameter platform (wood, plaster and paint). Minute mud eruptions captured at Námafjall, Iceland, during the Skri∂uklaustur residency in 2008

El Norte

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2013. Single-channel video projected at architectural scale, color, silent, 4:26 minutes. Captured in high definition video at Abandoned, Spitsbergen Island, Svalbard Archipelago, El Norte_ is a critique on the prevailing 15th century colonial attitude and in particular, its relation to the current geopolitics of the North Pole.

Recurrence Relation 2

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2011. Single-channel video projection, captured in 16mm film, 3:35 minutes, color, silent.
A tenuous image of a figure emerges from the distant horizon. The figure walks towards the viewer, even at times looks straight at the viewer, then continues beyond. Filmed in Moffen Island, International Territory of Svalbard, an archipelago near the north pole (80°N, 14.5°E), during the Arctic Circle 2010 residency.

Nothing Further Happens, 2011

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Single channel video. Captured in 16mm film throughout Iceland, Svalbard Archipelago, Atacama Desert in Chile, and in White Sands, United States. Sound by composer Ben Frost, Iceland. Duration: 9 mins. 38 secs. Continuous loop. Nothing Further Happens is a collection of land- and seascapes filmed in the past 5 years in Iceland, Svalbard archipelago in the high arctic, the salt flats in the desert of Atacama in Chile, and White Sands in New Mexico, U.S.

At Any Given Moment, Grass 2 with Burnt Wood, 2010

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At Any Given Moment, Grass 2 with Burnt Wood, 2010. Video art installation consisting of video projection (22 × 19ft), burnt wood, and sound (by Drew Schnurr).
The At Any Given Moment series explores issues of perception, specifically our relationship to technologically mediated nature. In At Any Given Moment, Grass 2, the repetitive rhythm, tight cropping, and large-scale image emphasize the work’s particular organizational logic in time and space.

At Any Given Moment, Fall 1 with Volcanic Rock, 2010

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At Any Given Moment, Fall 1 with Volcanic Rock is an architectural scale video art installation consisting of video projection, sound, and 4 tons of Volcanic Rock. Duration: Continuous loop. Size: Variable; site specific. Shown above at ‘Energy’, group exhibition at the Alyce Williamson Gallery. Size: 21ft 8 in x 18 ft. Duration: 9 minutes.

At Any Given Moment, Fall 2

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At Any Given Moment, Fall 2 is an architectural scale video art installation consisting of video projection, 4 tons of lava rocks, gravel and sand, and sound. Duration: Continuous loop. Size: Variable; site specific.

At Any Given Moment, River 1

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At Any Given Moment, River 1 is an architectural scale video art installation consisting of video projection and sound. Duration: Continuous loop. Size: Variable; site specific.

At Any Given Moment, River 2

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At Any Given Moment, River 2 is an architectural scale video art installation consisting of video projection and sound. Duration: Continuous loop. Size: Variable; site specific.

At Any Given Moment, Grass 1

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At Any Given Moment, Grass 1, is one in a series of video art installations filmed in Iceland between 2006 and 2008. The At Any Given Moment series explores issues of perception, specifically our relationship to technologically mediated nature. In At Any Given Moment, Grass 1, the repetitive rhythm, tight cropping, and large-scale image emphasize the work’s particular organizational logic in time and space.

Never Happened Again, Eucalyptus

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Never Happened Again is a series of single-channel video projection works shot with a Bolex Reflex 16mm film camera in Iceland and Los Angeles. Méndez’s interests in issues of perception expand into the perception of light by the apparatus— in this case, her 54-year old hand-cranked Bolex—and that of the film stock. Through this mechanism ‘chance’ is introduced into the making of the image, resulting in radiant chroma floods intensified by the irregular flickering of the frames, set against a subject matter of a mundane nature.

Never Happened Again, Glaciers 2

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Never Happened Again is a series of single-channel video projection works shot with a Bolex Reflex 16mm film camera in Iceland and Los Angeles. Méndez’s interests in issues of perception expand into the perception of light by the apparatus— in this case, her 54-year old hand-cranked Bolex—and that of the film stock. Through this mechanism ‘chance’ is introduced into the making of the image, resulting in radiant chroma floods intensified by the irregular flickering of the frames, set against a subject matter of a mundane nature.

Never Happened Again, Myvatn

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Never Happened Again is a series of single-channel video projection works shot with a Bolex Reflex 16mm film camera in Iceland and Los Angeles. Méndez’s interests in issues of perception expand into the perception of light by the apparatus— in this case, her 54-year old hand-cranked Bolex—and that of the film stock. Through this mechanism ‘chance’ is introduced into the making of the image, resulting in radiant chroma floods intensified by the irregular flickering of the frames, set against a subject matter of a mundane nature.

Never Happened Again, Karahnjukar

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Never Happened Again is a series of single-channel video projection works shot with a Bolex Reflex 16mm film camera in Iceland and Los Angeles. Méndez’s interests in issues of perception expand into the perception of light by the apparatus— in this case, her 54-year old hand-cranked Bolex—and that of the film stock. Through this mechanism ‘chance’ is introduced into the making of the image, resulting in radiant chroma floods intensified by the irregular flickering of the frames, set against a subject matter of a mundane nature.

Recurrence Relation 1

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Recurrence Relation 1 is a video art installation, where the tenuous image of a male figure emerges from a dense fog. He walks towards the viewer, even at times looks straight onto the viewer, then continues beyond the viewer. The landscape of the barren tundra sits still as birds fly by or land. Seconds later, the figure emerges again, to repeat the same pathway, endlessly.

Weatherscapes Series

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Weatherscapes is an artwork series exploring the relationship of the weather and the landscape as it relates to human scale. Weather­—fog, lightning, rain, ice, clouds—inhabits the otherwise vast abstract space between the body and the distant horizon. Weatherscapes capture a more compact environment, one that the body can engage with physically, creating a continuous and intimate ensemble between the body, the weather and the landscape.

Here Over There

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Here Over There is a photographic series of straight-on portraits of hotel beds that began on the island of Chiloe, Chile, on December 23, 2002 and continues to this date. Working in a documentary style, so neutral in emotional values that is almost anthropological, I photograph the beds I sleep on during my travels with consistent parameters—the image is taken as soon as I awake, on the first morning of my stay, with the available light, with a hand held camera, and from the same point of view—my height.

There Is No There

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There Is No There, 2009. Triptych. Each panel: 20h x 13.33w. Archival inkjet print, plexiglass, white silkscreen ink. There Is No There, a visual and verbal loop, structured as a triptych to emphasize the organizational logic of both the photograph and of language. The work attempts to affirm the existence of something and, at the same time, to negate its position in time and space. It focuses on issues of ambiguity and indetermination.

About To Happen

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About to Happenconsists of isolated single still frames of her 16mm film shoot throughout Iceland. In Dettifoss 001, Méndez captures an instant of Europe’s largest waterfall—500 cubic metres per second, and in Brekka 001, a moment of giant rye grass being forcefully blown by the wind.

Tree by Tree, from Sea to Mountains, 2008.

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Rebeca Méndez was commissioned by the Los Angeles County Arts Commission to create an art installation for the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk warehouse in Santa Fe Springs, Los Angeles County, CA. Reviewed by The Los Angeles Times

University of Cincinnati : C-Store

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Thom Mayne and his firm Morphosis designed a 353,000 sq. ft. student recreation center on the campus at the University of Cincinnati, which opened on May, 2006. Rebeca Méndez was commissioned to create six murals measuring 9 by 20 feet each to be suspended from the ceiling at the convenience store of the Rec Center…

University of Cincinnati: Marché

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Thom Mayne and his firm Morphosis designed a 353,000 sq. ft. student recreation center on the campus at the University of Cincinnati, which opened on May, 2006. Rebeca Méndez was commissioned to create a public art installation on four cone-like structures, two of them reaching over 50 feet high and piercing through the roof….

Homeland # 3

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’Méndez, in her Homeland series, explores a sense of ambivalence—while her panoramic images allude to the sublime in nature, they simultaneously reveal their synthetic process of construction. Incorporated in each landscape is a short line of text capturing a sensation, memory, or experience triggered by the landscape, including references to sustenance—for example, the words ‘till the last tree’ over an image of cows grazing.