Rebeca Méndez

Happenings

BECOMING WITH #1

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Becoming With #1 is a single-channel video captured at Eldhraun lava field (“Fire Lava“) in Iceland, which is the biggest lava flow in the world. Enlisting nature as my guide and partner I seek to understand with openness and empathy what my humanity has in common with other species and thus collaborate with nature. I explore how it feels to become someone else or some thing else, to enter the awareness of another species and develop intimate interspecies friendships with the wild, a post-humanist action. In Becoming With #1 the relationship is with the woolly fringemoss (Racomitrium lanuginosum) which is a widespread species of moss found in montane and arctic tundra across the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

Between the Lines: Typography in LACMA’s Collection

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Rebeca Méndez in the group exhibition Between the Lines: Typography in LACMA’s Collection. May 12, 2019–ongoing. Typography is at the heart of visual communication. Drawn entirely from acquisitions made since 2014 as part of LACMA’s Graphic Design Initiative, the more than 30 posters and publications in this exhibition represent a range of typographic approaches from the mid-20th century through the present. Between the Lines: Typography in LACMA’s Collection features the work of many influential international designers including Charles and Ray Eames, April Greiman, Corita Kent, Takenobu Igarashi, Rebeca Méndez, Paul Rand, Massimo Vignelli, and Wolfgang Weingart.

2018 NDA Winners’ Salon | Rebeca Méndez Master Class

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2012 National Design Award winner Rebeca Méndez leads a master class at the Cooper Hewitt Museum exploring the themes on view in her exhibition Rebeca Méndez Selects, and her research and practice around ‘artistic fieldwork practice.’ Méndez also discusses the CounterForce Lab, a center she created within UCLA, School of Art and Architecture with a focus on art, design and environment.

Rebeca Méndez is the 17th guest curator of the Selects series permanent collection. For her installation, Méndez draws on the tragic history of Aztec ruler Moctezuma II’s private aviary to reflect on birds as sources of design inspiration and scientific study, as well as victims of climate change and human avarice.